Sunday, June 26, 2016

Barnes & Noble has a good idea - add alcohol-serving restaurants to stores

The retail struggles of Barnes and Noble Inc. have been the poster child for illustrating Amazon's internet dominance in book retailing.

The company, which has a long history of inhibiting its internet appeal with both online shoppers and ebook buyers, has just come up with a concept that might boost in-store sales. Bloomberg reported that B&N has created a new restaurant group and plans to open eateries that serve alcohol in Eastchester, New York; Edina, Minnesota; Folsom, California; and Loudon, Virginia.

Having people in your retail space who have been loosened up with some alcohol would definitely boost impulse buys, especially of those flashy titles that are the print equivalent of clickbait.

I know that having a bit of an alcohol buzz makes me want to buy books. Long ago, when I was childless and had income that I could dispose of on myself instead of whining ingrates,  I'd love to settle in for an episode of the Daily Show after an evening of writing after work. I'd have a drink while I watched the show. And about once a month, I would become enamored with some author guest and go to my computer and order his or her book from Amazon.

Alcohol simply makes you more inclined to go after what you want. Of course, wanting is not the same as having, but, in retail, the buying is what matters.

Despite its desire to transform itself into a tipsy meat market for lonely bibliophiles buying impressive books to impress each other, Barnes & Noble is still managing to exist on the internet.

Even after the demise of the Nook ereader, I continue to sell ebooks day in and day out at the Nook Store.

So, if you'd like to drink in private, or you prefer to browse a vast online selection instead of the lowest-common-denominator du jour that is the world of a chain bookstore, look for my novels in the Nook store.

You can start any of my series with a free ebook:











A note from Tracy Falbe: Be the first to know about my new releases and special sales at Brave Luck Books. Join the Readers' List. Ebooks and audiobooks available worldwide. Print in select countries.

Saturday, June 25, 2016

New Amazon Kindle device readable in bright sunlight




Reading ebooks on tablets usually works just fine, except many tablets have one drawback: They are often hard to read in sunlight. To solve this problem, Amazon has developed a new Kindle with some improvements of interest to avid readers. It's now available for preorder for a July 7th release.

Features:

  • 11% thinner and 16% lighter than the previous generation Kindle, making it easy and comfortable to hold in one hand.
  • Kindle uses actual ink particles and proprietary, hand-built fonts to create crisp text similar to what you see in a physical book. The blacks and whites on the screen are uniform, improving text and image quality.
  • No screen glare, even in bright sunlight, unlike tablets
  • Kindle doesn't need power to maintain a page of text, allowing you to read for weeks on a single charge.
  • Unlike reflective tablet and smartphone screens, the high contrast touchscreen display eliminates glare in any setting—even direct sunlight.
If you're interested in getting the new Kindle, then you might want to think about an Amazon Kindle Unlimited 30-Day Free Trial. For $9.99 a month, you'll get access to a large selection of ebooks in many subjects and genres.




A note from Tracy Falbe: Be the first to know about my new releases and special sales at Brave Luck Books. Join the Readers' List. Ebooks and audiobooks available worldwide. Print in select countries.

Wednesday, June 22, 2016

Dark fantasy on Kindle Unlimited - Lessons Learned



Use the previewer above to start reading my short story set in the Rys World. It's a dark fantasy available on Kindle Unlimited. Meet my magical hero Shan centuries before the events depicted in The Rys Chronicles when he faces a crucial choice between evil and compassion.



A note from Tracy Falbe: Be the first to know about my new releases and special sales at Brave Luck Books. Join the Readers' List. Ebooks and audiobooks available worldwide. Print in select countries.

Teens might prefer print books a little but ebooks allow for reading privacy



In this article from the Guardian, I read that teens prefer print books to ebooks. This might seem odd when you think how teens are universally addicted to their tablets and phones, but I think I have some explanations.

Identity vs. Clutter

Based on my experience selling books at comic and gaming conventions, I've noticed some differences in teens and adults. Although this is only anecdotal, I've had encounters in which the teen does want the paperback and the parent wants to know how to get the ebook.

I believe that some teens will be attracted to the physical object because they're looking to surround themselves with things that express their identity. Books do this very well because you can carry them around and display them.

A parent, however, will be engaged in the endless task of keeping clutter at bay. An adult, much like myself, might also know what it's like to a move a household across a continent. Even the most devout bibliophile might experience a change of heart after lugging boxes of books on and off a truck on a hot summer day. Ebooks present a marvelous alternative to this.

At the end of the day, however, teens and adults will vary in their preferences. I'm sure many teens delight in the privacy that their tablet provides for their reading material. They can indulge in sex, drugs, and rock-and-roll and no one needs to know.

Industry Spin

The publishing industry is a big one, and if it can come up with some information that supports the claim that teens like paper books, they'll get it out there so they can sell books, especially to adults that want to give a gift to a teen.

Also a closer look at the publishing industry news about the gains for print and the decline of ebooks shows that the information is incomplete. It does not really take into account the growing share of ebook sales going to indie authors. Sales analysis done by Author Earnings and Hugh Howey shows that more readers are buying indie ebooks, which is likely the source in the decline of ebook sales for large publishing companies.

Furthermore, publishing guru Jane Friedman wrote that the rise in print comes from the current popularity of adult coloring books.

All of my fantasy novels are available in print or digital formats.




You can read my historical fantasy Werelord Thal: A Renaissance Werewolf Tale for free:

Brave Luck Books
Smashwords
Google Play Store
Kobo
Amazon Kindle
Nook
Apple iBooks

Paperback is only $12.99 plus shipping

Createspace
Amazon US
Amazon UK
Amazon Germany
Amazon France
Amazon Italy
Amazon Spain


A note from Tracy Falbe: Be the first to know about my new releases and special sales at Brave Luck Books. Join the Readers' List. Ebooks and audiobooks available worldwide. Print in select countries.

Saturday, June 4, 2016

Keeping it real for fantasy warriors




Does it ever bother you when you’re watching a movie and someone gets shot in the shoulder but still runs up and down a mountain, gets in a fist fight, and isn’t even really bleeding 15 minutes later?

I enjoy fantasy but I can’t imagine away chunks of flesh flying loose from the upper body and not having to take a breather. If a warrior takes a bad wound, he better have a friend ready to jump in and defend him from the mortal blow. Then he’s going to need someone with surgical skills, magical power, or at least a few drops of regenerative extract of phoenix root.

Fantasy warriors can have mad skills, but acquiring them should take more training than can be fit into a fortnight. A really good fighter needs to work at it and stay in shape. Some mention of an athletic regimen should accompany these brave characters who draw swords with supreme confidence. A man who duels with a tribe’s select champion as just part of daily negotiating practice needs some established experience.

Like professional athletes, fantasy warriors need time to recover from injuries. For the sake of physical realism, even within a magical story, I prefer a character that has to endure some pain and vulnerability after a hard battle. This time of reflection can add nicely to story and character development too.

I’m not at all against magic being involved in recovery. Healing potions and spells are mainstays of fantasy stories, but they should not be thrown around like chocolates on Halloween. Magic requires energy and skill. Using it has costs and consequences.


What makes fantasy great in my opinion are elements beyond illegitimate levels of battle skill and lack of physical consequences. I enjoy the genre because of its willingness to indulge in raw primal physical conflict. A warrior really does solve problems with violence sometimes. That’s a fantasy that relieves the angry pressures that build up in people.

Reading about fantasy warriors gives escape from the confines of a mundane and belittling existence. It’s nice to imagine having the strength and skill to overcome enemies or deliver justice. But if he gets hit on the head or cut open with a sword, someone better have a healing spell ready, and the hero is going to need some bed rest with preferably a buxom maiden to fuss over him.

If you're like me, then read my fantasy novels.

I have 10 of them published right now.

Browse my titles at any of your favorite online retailers, like Amazon, iBooks, Google Play, Smashwords, Nook, or Kobo.

Visit my website Brave Luck Books and download free ebooks.






A note from Tracy Falbe: Be the first to know about my new releases and special sales at Brave Luck Books. Join the Readers' List. Ebooks and audiobooks available worldwide. Print in select countries.

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